University of Miami Implementing New Concussion Detecting Technology

The University of Miami has revealed a new headgear set that they will begin using to test for concussions. The test will take approximately 20 to 30 seconds for each individual.

A Miami player using the new goggles

A Miami player using the new goggles

If successful, the goggles can be revolutionary for the medical field. Whereas some testing can take time or yield invalid results, this form of testing aims at a quick response time with little error.

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NFL Working under new concussion protocol

For many years, the NFL failed to warn its players about the dangers of repeatedly taking blows to the head. In light of a recent lawsuit by over 5,000 former players that ended in a multi-million dollar settlement, the NFL has implemented a new protocol for its teams to follow.

A Giants player is analyzed after taking a possible concussion inducing hit.

A Giants player is analyzed after taking a possible concussion inducing hit.

The new protocol not only requires players to pass their own team trainer’s test, it also requires the player to go through professional neurologists testing. This protocol was long overdue and it’s a shame that the league waited to protect its players until former players spoke out against them.

Deceased Ohio State player had history of Unreported Concussions

Tragedy struck the Ohio State football program on Sunday. Senior walk-on Kosta Karageorge, who had been reported missing four days earlier, was found dead in a dumpster near the Ohio State campus. It appeared he had died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Kosta Karageorge

Kosta Karageorge

One of Karageorge’s teammates said that Karageorge suffered multiple concussions, but he never reported them. Depression is one of the side effects that comes with concussions. Although this is an unfortunate circumstance, maybe more athletes will feel more inclined to report their concussions instead of playing through them.

Hall of Fame Player said football wasn’t worth the medical issues

Former NFL linebacker Harry Carson said in a recent interview that if he would have known the long-term medical risk of playing football, he would have never played the game.

Carson poses with his bust during the Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony Saturday, Aug. 5, 2006, in Canton, Ohio.

Carson poses with his bust during the Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony Saturday, Aug. 5, 2006, in Canton, Ohio.

Carson said he suffers from blurred vision, depression, and headaches because of the concussions he suffered during his Hall of Fame career. Carson said he guarantees his grandson will not play football so he won’t suffer the same fate.

Kentucky area makes strong strides in fight against concussions

Concussions and football have sadly arrived at the point where they go hand in hand. A county in Kentucky was granted a $150,000 grant to purchase 235 helmets, provide salary for trainers, and most importantly, maintain their concussion testing.

Concussions can leave permanent damage on the brain.

Concussions can leave permanent damage on the brain.

This is something that more areas need to try and do. Concussions are depriving many athletes of playing a beautiful game. The issue needs to be addressed the way Kentucky has attempted to address it.

Young football player has dream ruined because of concussions

In Southern California a 15-year-old football player has suffered from multiple concussions that have resulted in his dream of becoming a professional football player coming to an end.

His mother said after taking numerous concussion-inducing hits and playing through them, her son “has the body of a 40-year-old man.”

A graph showing concussion stats among high school football

A graph showing concussion stats among high school football

A neurosurgeon said that if the young man continued his playing career, he could face permanent brain damage.

The mother of the young man said, “He mostly sleeps. He has headaches, insomnia, depression — all the classic concussion symptoms. He can’t watch TV for long, can’t play video games.”

San Antonio area offers free concussion screenings for local high schools

The Valero Alamo Bowl has formed a partnership with the Sports Medicine Associates of San Antonio to cover the cost of brain screening for five San Antonio high schools and their football programs.

A football player after suffering a hit that resulted in a concussion.

A football player after suffering a hit that resulted in a concussion.

After a two year trial, the Alamo Bowl pledged enough money to screen a minimum of 10,000 San Antonio high school athletes using ImPACT® testing.

The baseline ImPACT® test is the initial evaluation, creating a fingerprint of the brain. The original test is then available to assist and evaluate  an athlete’s head injury or concussion.

LSU Football Implementing New Mouthpieces to Combat Concussion

i1 Biometrics and the LSU football program are testing a new type of technology to try and reduce the risk of players contracting concussions. The Vector Mouthguard  is being used by 20 players in practice and in games for LSU.

The Vector Mouthguard LSU is using

The Vector Mouthguard LSU is using

Although it is not the first piece of equipment that tracks data on hits players take, i1 Biometrics said it is the first piece of equipment to track the impact the player is actually receiving. Instead of sensors in a helmet that tracks how much impact the helmet takes, the mouthpiece stays in contact with the skull and tracks the force it takes. The mouthpiece sends the information in real time to a smart phone on the sidelines and if used properly, i1 Biometrics said this technology could prevent players from playing through those mild concussions that can’t be spotted.

Sideline Robot Now Aiding Trainers In Identifying Concussions

Not every football team has the ability to have a neurologist readily available on their sideline to evaluate athletes if concussion-like symptoms occur. Dartmouth College is making an attempt to change that. The football program is now using a robot titled VGo.

The VGo robot Dartmouth is using to assist trainers

The VGo robot Dartmouth is using to assist trainers

The robot will provide a neurologist to remotely monitor athletes at several different locations at the same time. Steve Broglio, director of the Neurosport Research Lab at the University of Michigan, said if successful, VGo could greatly benefit athletes and their health.

Study shows more than 80 percent of concussions go unreported

Harvard and Boston University researched the number of concussions reported in football at all levels and the results were surprising.

The study showed that for every concussion a player had diagnosed, they had four suspected and undiagnosed ones. Players were asked how often they had received a hit and were deemed okay to play even thought they felt concussion-like symptoms such as dizziness, vomited, loss of  consciousness, or seeing stars.

The results showed that over 80 percent of concussions went unnoticed or were kept hidden from doctors. Read the full story here